215: Horticulture, Cut Specimens (2 of 2)

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Horticulture, Cut Specimens - Classes 1-14, Flowers, Ferns, Roses, Bulbs, Corms, Rhizomes, Tubers
Horticulture, Cut Specimens - Classes 1-14

Here in Gallery 215 we have 14 classes of Cut Specimens: perennials-with blooms returning every year, annuals—plants that bloom only one year, roses, bulbs, Corms, Rhizomes, Tubers, and ferns.  In horticulture flowers are grouped into three categories, Round forms, Spike forms, and Spray forms.  And be sure to note the Old Garden Roses in Class 8 as they have been around for 150 years—established in 1867 or earlier!   

Round Form Flowers
Round Form Flowers

Round heads, such as zinnias, marigolds, and asters, are circular with a circular center.  Petals should be the same length, width, shape, and be equally spaced with smooth and even margins.  Doubles are round flowers with deep full heads and outer petals that bend slightly backward while the inner petal rows cup forward.  In the ideal specimen, all petals in the same row should be uniform in length, width, shape, and spacing.  And a flower with its center popping up is penalized. 

 

Spike Form Flowers
Spike Form Flowers

Spike flowers, including stocks, snapdragons, and salvia, are evaluated particularly for the number of flowers and buds on a stem.  Exhibitors seek to display a maximum number of open flowers usually in the proportion of two-thirds open flowers to one-third developing buds.  The flowers should be uniformly colored, sized, and spaced.  And one-third of the overall exhibit should be the stem—itself being sturdy and straight to the tip.

Spray Form Flowers
Spray Form Flowers

Spray form flowers such as sweetpeas and cosmos, are considered both for their overall general merit and that of the individual florets.  General attributes include the number so flowers and buds, branching, grace, and vitality of the of the spray as a whole.  Floret attributes include their form and consistency.  For more information, click the Division button below to learn more about the principles and elements of design on the Your Artistic Eye page of this app.

More about Roses
More about Roses

There are 5 types of Modern Roses on display.  Floribunda roses produce dense clusters of flowers several times a season.  Hybrid Tea Roses bloom repeatedly through the summer months—most having a wonderful fragrance, mild to powerful. These roses normally produce one bloom per long stem—making them ideal for cutting.  The name Hybrid Tea comes from the cross breeding between the hybrid perpetual rose and the tea rose.  Grandifloras is another type of modern rose, developed in 1955 as the “Queen Elizabeth” rose.  Thought by many to be the best of both worlds, grandifloras develop clustered blossoms throughout the season—like floribundas, while producing the elegantly shaped blooms of Hybird Teas.   Grandifloras grow up to 7 feet, are hardy, and disease-resistant.  Miniature roses and Shrubs complete the categories of Modern roses on display.